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Call For Proposals

4th ILA Women and Leadership Conference
Building Solutions, Harmony & the Greater Good
16-19 June 2019 | 1440 Multiversity, Santa Cruz, CA, U.S.A.


Thank you to all who submitted proposals and volunteered to be peer reviewers! Acceptance notifications will go out on or before 15 Jan. 2019. The program will go live by 28 Feb. 2019.  

Read Complete CFP

Read the complete Call for Proposals by scrolling below or Download the PDF.

Gather Information 

Talk with colleagues and gather the information you need to submit your proposal. Find out what's needed below.

Submit By 15 November

The CFP submission system opens on the 15th of September and closes on the 15th of November. 

Want to read about the latest practices and research about women and leadership? 

VOLUNTEER TO REVIEW

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The 2019 ILA Women and Leadership Affinity Group Conference Committee is proud to announce the 4th biennial conference scheduled from 16-19 June 2019 at the beautiful 1440 Multiversity, nestled in the redwoods near Santa Cruz, California, USA. The conference theme is Women in Leadership: Building Solutions, Harmony, and the Greater Good. We are seeking abstracts, papers, symposia, workshops, cases, panels, and interactive roundtable topics that represent the best contemporary thinking about women and leadership from a diverse range of leadership scholars, practitioners, educators, program directors, consultants, students, and other leaders and leadership professionals. All proposals must be submitted using the online system, which will be available from 15 September to 15 November 2018.

Quick Links

THEMES/STREAMS

Through this worldwide open call for submissions, the conference organizers seek proposals for presentations on women and leadership that will be valuable in a wide range of contexts, sectors, cultures, and geographies. 

There are five conference streams; the first four reflect calls to action included in the Asilomar Declaration and Call to Action on Women and Leadership issued in 2013 to inspire the participants at the first ILA Women and Leadership Conference and updated following the 2015 conference. Described in detail below, the streams are: 

  • Helping Girls and Young Women Become Leaders
  • Leadership Development and Education Worldwide
  • Advancing Women in Leadership
  • Equality in Power and Decision Making
  • Conference Theme: Building Solutions, Harmony, and the Greater Good

We welcome especially submissions with a global perspective that report on research and practice regarding women leading the achievement of the United Nations 17 2015-2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) referred to as the Agenda 2030.

Helping Girls and Young Women Become Leaders

Stream Co-Chairs: Chanda Elbert and Anne M. Spear

This stream is focused on discussions of the ways and means of leader development in girls and young women. The stream will facilitate the sharing of contemporary approaches for developing the skills and competencies that girls and young women need to serve as leaders, and that prepare them for future leader roles. We hope for papers, panels, symposia, and workshops where presenters provide perspectives from Western and Non-Western contexts, from elementary schools, high schools and universities; from school or university-based programs, as well as those run by other organizations; and research-based as well as practice-based discussions.

Areas of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Discussions on the knowledge, skills, and abilities that girls and young women need to learn in order to serve as leaders
  • Best practices to facilitate the leader development of girls
  • Programs based in schools, universities, churches, non-profit, and other organizational contexts
  • Case studies
  • Comparative research comparing different programs addressing girls' and women's leadership
  • What schools and universities can do to raise girls and young women as leaders
  • Removing barriers that keep young women and girls from leader roles
  • Intergenerational mentoring for girls' and young women's leader development
  • Theoretical and conceptual discussions on girls' and young women's leader development
  • Web-based, camp-based, and other formats for girls' and young women's leader development
  • Contemporary and historical perspectives on girls' and young women's leader development
  • How developing countries are implementing leadership programs and overall education programs for girls to achieve UN SDG Goals 4 and 5

Leader Development and Education Worldwide

Stream Co-Chairs: Sherylle Tan and Carolina Darbisi

The growth of leadership education and leader development programs for women has accelerated greatly, as has research and scholarship in this area. This conference stream will facilitate the sharing of contemporary approaches to leadership education that support the development of competencies needed for women to successfully exercise leadership at local, national, and international levels.

The organizers invite data-driven proposals on innovative curricular and co-curricular leadership education programming, pedagogy, and effective processes for the development of women's leadership. We welcome submissions aimed at advancing women's leader development and education particularly in domestic, global, and international leadership contexts; submissions with an emphasis on preparing women to exercise leadership in diverse settings; and those that compare and contrast multiple approaches, courses, or programs.

Areas of particular interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Challenges faced by leadership educators, coaches, consultants
  • Coaching and mentoring
  • Curriculum design and development: models, theories, and approaches
  • Leadership education programs in developing countries that build women’s leadership skills to access the politico-economic systems and to position themselves to lead strategies to address the UN SDGs
  • Developing leadership knowledge, skills, and competencies
  • Ethical decision making in a global society
  • Innovations in leadership education (programs, courses, pedagogies)
  • International business leadership and global effectiveness
  • Multiple social identities impacting the ability to lead
  • Negotiation
  • Program content (creating, assessing, sharing models, curricula)
  • Challenges faced by leadership educators, coaches, consultants
  • Organizational change and process improvement
  • Place-based programs (corporate, government, non-profit, university, etc.)
  • Program evaluation: measurement and assessment of program or learning outcomes
  • Social entrepreneurship and social justice
  • Team building and leadership (in sports, organizations, or other systems)
  • Teaching and training methodologies
  • Using technology and social media as tools to enhance learning and development
  • UN, World Bank, and bilateral and private donor women’s leadership education programs in developing countries

Advancing Women in Leadership

Stream Co-Chairs: Janet McNellis and Misty Resendez

Participants of the inaugural conference at Asilomar determined a paradigm shift is necessary to augment and bolster the gains made in leadership roles for women. Inclusive leadership practices, based on "fit" rather than gender, were identified as critical to more effectively address women's challenges in our increasingly complex, global world. This stream will help build an operational definition of effective leadership practices, assist women to develop a personal leader identity, and address institutional, structural, and relational barriers that will facilitate a paradigm shift to advance women in leadership.

Submissions on relational, consensus-building, inclusive leadership styles are encouraged, as are examples of collaborative, developmental practices between scholars and practitioners. Empirical and theoretical/conceptual presentations are welcome, along with presentations on practical approaches to address an individual's self-limiting beliefs and inefficacious behaviors. We invite submissions that explore unexamined assumptions and double standards, as well as invisible barriers embedded in organizational cultures, that constrain opportunities for women.

Areas of particular interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Links between organizational performance and gender representation
  • Inclusivity as a moral and business imperative
  • Leader identity, especially embodiment of inclusive leadership practices
  • Tailored developmental activities that create new archetypes
  • Culturally-specific or intersectional approaches to advancing women in leadership
  • Mindset, self-efficacy, and leadership
  • Unconscious bias and structural barriers in the workplace
  • Mentorship, sponsorship, and formal/informal networks
  • "Small wins" approach to change
  • Recognition and awards for paradigm-shifting programs or activities
  • Beijing +20 collaborative opportunities
  • Stories of how international development projects have helped to empower women to assume more influential leadership roles in their governments and economies.
  • Leadership approaches employed by women leaders in the United Nations and in developing countries to promote the implementation of the Agenda 2030
  • Evidence that women’s active leadership is key to the achievement of all of the 17 SDGs

Equality in Power and Decision Making

Stream Co-Chairs: Wendy Rowe and Mary Tabata

Despite tireless work by countless numbers of women, men, and youth around the globe to create a world of equity, research continues to document a persistent gender imbalance in leadership positions and key decision-making bodies in both the public and private realm. Additionally, to make meaningful changes, it is not merely equality in access to power that is at issue; the very nature of how – and for what – that power is used needs to be challenged. As women obtain more power and influence in leadership, how this leadership can transform power relationships based on dominance to relationships based on cooperation needs to be examined.

The purpose of this stream is to address the work being done to understand and address this imbalance. This includes advancing our understanding of the emerging and innovative ways that women in leadership positions are transforming their own lives, their relationships, and systems to reflect the value of cooperation and collaboration and to create bridges of deep understanding.

Proposals are encouraged in the three domains suggested in the United Nations' Womenwatch strategy: (1) the social/cultural domain; (2) the economic domain; and (3) the political/civic domain. Equity and equality in power and decision making will likely look different in each domain, as will the strategies and tactics used to accomplish change. Within these broad domains, proposals are appreciated that inform us of the ways women in leadership positions are pursuing the UN SDGs, in particular to change systems of inequity and inequality that are perpetuating hunger, poverty, injustice, and lack of access to quality health care, education, clean water, employment, and other basic human rights.

Areas of particular interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Forms of power and authority enacted by women in leadership roles
  • Gender parity and women's representation at the executive table
  • Sources and amounts of power available to women leaders
  • Authority/influence relationships exercised by women as opposed to power relationships
  • Doing power differently
  • Feminist and other critical perspectives on power and influence in women and leadership
  • Women's contributions to leadership in light of contextual norms, cultures, meanings, and standards at the local level
  • Personal practices that contribute or transform the personal, relational, or global dominance modalities of power
  • Practices that contribute to or transform the existence of second-generation gender bias
  • The concept of "soft power" and its relationship to handling conflicts and effective leadership
  • Generational differences and influences and their implications for women in leadership decision making roles
  • The shifting economic and socio-political environment and how it impacts women in decision-making roles
  • Negotiation styles of women
  • Women in governance roles, including senior management and board of directors, in for profit, not-for-profit, and government organizations
  • Women in international development purposefully working to achieve one or more of the UN SDGs
  • Women in the developing countries who have formed coalitions and organizations to fight for a transformation of the socio-economic systems in their country that perpetuate inequality

Conference Theme: Building Solutions, Harmony, and the Greater Good

Stream Co-Chairs: Elizabeth Stork and Lazarina Topuzova

The conference theme celebrates and explores the contributions women are making in today’s complex, rapidly changing, interdependent, and often contentious world. We recognize that the building process may start with finding harmony and balance within our own lives, extend to seeking solutions for our immediate communities, and broaden to include seeking peace for the planet.

We welcome research and examples of experiences bridging differences to find solutions; finding harmony and balance within; developing skills and methods to resolve conflicts; restoring fairness and justice in our communities; and creating constructive relationships and positive efforts for sustainable peace in the world. Proposals advancing research and/or practice in women’s leadership in achieving the UN Agenda 2030 would be of interest.

Areas of particular interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Approaches to achieve personal harmony with ourselves, others, and the environment
  • Methods for building personal harmony through best practices such as centering practices, visualization, stress management, meditation, mindfulness training, journaling, artwork, music, mind-body exercise, etc.
  • Research and cases of women leaders around the globe who have fought for peace and reconciliation
  • Research and cases of women working to achieve one or more of the UN 17 SDGs
  • Best practices and skill sets for achieving solutions and harmony such as creating safe spaces, dialoguing across differences, building consensus, and/or resolving conflict, i.e. intergroup dialogue, mediation, negotiations, restorative practices and peacebuilding

Special Notes

A special Symposium section entitled “Building Solutions, Harmony, and the Greater Good” is planned for the Journal of Leadership Studies, volume 13, issue 3 tentatively scheduled for publication in September 2019. Papers submitted to the conference theme stream will be considered for inclusion in this Symposium.

Given the new submission category of Case Study, an expert and award-winning case writer, Professor Colleen Sharen, will be assisting the Stream Co-Chairs in reviewing the Case submissions.

AWARDS

Best Paper Award

New this year is an award for the best conference paper. All Full Papers accepted for Individual Presentation (Scholarly Full Paper) in any of the streams including the conference theme stream will be eligible for the Best Paper Award - Women in Leadership. The seven evaluation criteria described below will be used to select the best paper.

Best Case Award

New this year is an award for the best conference case. All Full Cases accepted for Individual Presentation (Practice-Based Full Case) in any of the streams including the conference theme stream will be eligible for the Best Case Award - Women in Leadership. The seven evaluation criteria described below will be used to select the best case.

NOTIFICATION

Submission confirmations, acceptance/rejection notifications, scheduling information, etc. will be sent by email to the primary email address listed on your ILA profile. Please ensure that your ILA profile includes a valid email address and daytime phone number, and that your email system accepts messages from @allacademic.com and @ila-net.org. These emails will be sent directly from the CFP system, and a copy of every message sent to you by the system is available by logging in and clicking on the Message Center link in the Submitter Menu. If you are concerned that notification emails are not reaching you, please check the Message Center in the CFP system or contact ILA at WLcfp@ila-net.org.

Status notifications will be emailed to everyone by 15 January 2019. All submitters will be emailed notification and other individuals listed on a proposal will be copied; however, submitters are responsible for ensuring that all co-presenters, chairs, and discussants are aware of presentation status, scheduling information, and/or changes to the presentation format (e.g. from a paper to a roundtable).

If accepted, please confirm your conference participation on or before 28 January 2019 by registering for the conference. All attending participants listed on an accepted proposal will be emailed their presentation date, time, and room by 22 February 2019.

GENERAL INFORMATION AND REQUIREMENTS

Registration Requirements

If your submission is accepted, each presenter listed must register for the conference. The ILA does not pay presenters honoraria, reimburse expenses (e.g. travel, lodging, or copying), or waive conference registration fees. All presenters, co-presenters, chairs, and commentators are required to register and pay published conference fees by 28 January 2019.

Audio/Visual Equipment

LCD projectors, extension speakers, PC lap tops loaded with Microsoft Office, and flip charts will be provided for all presentations in concurrent session rooms. No audio-visual equipment will be available for the Developmental Roundtable Discussions or the Interactive Roundtable sessions. If you require high-speed dedicated Internet access for your presentation, you will have to pay for this yourself at a cost to be determined. ILA's director of conferences, Bridget Chisholm, will assist you with the arrangements. She can be reached at WLcfp@ila-net.org.

Adding A Participant

All participants listed on a proposal must have ILA profiles and those profiles must be linked to the CFP system before they can be added to the proposal. Not sure if a participant is in the ILA database? You can go here and type their email address to confirm if they are already in the system and if not, you can add them before you begin or as you complete your submission. (Note: Creating an ILA profile is not the same as becoming an ILA member.)

Need to add a participant to the ILA database? Go here and:

  1. enter an email address
  2. create a temporary password
  3. provide basic information (full name, job title, company/institution, country)

The person added will receive an email advising them of their addition to the ILA database.

Affiliation Listings

The names and affiliations (i.e. title, department, organization) of all scheduled presenters, co-authors, chairs, and discussants will be printed in the program. This information will be pulled directly from your ILA profile, so please make sure your affiliation information in your ILA profile is correct. Many of our members and conference presenters work at the nexus of leadership theory and practice and have affiliations at more than one organization. We allow submitters to add two distinct affiliations to their ILA profile in order to share this richness of experience.

GENERAL PROPOSAL GUIDLELINES

Please make sure to review all submission requirements and guidelines prior to submitting. Submissions that do not follow the guidelines will not be reviewed.

Maximums

  • Proposals may include up to four presenters (excluding chair or commentator).
  • An individual may be listed as a presenter on a maximum of two submissions.
  • An individual may be listed as Chair or Commentator on a maximum of two submissions.
  • An individual may be included as a presenter in only one Interactive Roundtable Discussion as all Interactive Roundtable Discussions will be scheduled during a single session.
  • There are no maximums for non-presenting/non-attending contributors.

Consent of Presenters

All participants listed on a proposal must have given their consent to be part of the proposal prior to submission. It is the responsibility of the proposal submitter to adhere to this rule for all individuals listed on the proposal.

SUBMISSION INFORMATION

NOTE: The proposal system only allows for plain text to be entered into the text box fields. Therefore, all formatted text (font sizes, colors, bolding, italics, etc.) will appear as plain text. Please do not include tables, graphics, photos, etc. Formatted text and exhibits are allowed in Full Papers and Full Cases.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN the submission process, please be sure you have the following:

Participant Information: Name, contact information, and organizational affiliation/s for each confirmed presenter, chair, or discussant.

Selection of Presentation Streams: One primary and one secondary.

Presentation Format: Complete Session or Individual Presentation.

Field Information: The following fields appear in the online submission system. Unless noted otherwise, all fields are required and appear for all proposal types.

  • Title: In title case (capitalize nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, subordinate conjunctions, and any word that is more than three letters long), 100 characters maximum, including spaces.
  • Short Description: A brief description of the proposal, which will be used in the online and printed programs. Remember the short description is what will entice attendees to your presentation room. 80 words maximum.
  • Detailed Abstract: An expanded explanation of your proposal that will be used to review the proposal and to provide more information in the online program. 500-1,000-words maximum, excluding references (not required for full papers and full cases).
  • References: All sessions must include references, and all references included should be cited in-text of the Detailed Abstract, Full Paper, or Full Case.
  • Secondary Stream: (optional) An opportunity to indicate that your proposal could be considered for one other stream.
  • Full Papers: When a full paper is uploaded, no detailed abstract is needed. A Full Paper must:
    • Be previously unpublished;
    • Be completed in the following format: Times New Roman 12-point font, double spaced, 1-inch (2.5 cm) margin, and 8.5 by 11-inch page setting or A4 (APA 6th is required);
    • Have a page count within the range of 15-25 pages, double-spaced (including figures, table, references); and
    • Be uploaded as a Microsoft Word document.
  • Full Cases: When a full case is uploaded, no detailed abstract is needed. A Full Case must:
    • Be previously unpublished;
    • Have permission to submit (signed release form) and permission must accompany the submission; while consultants or academics may identify potential cases, the client (the protagonist and their organization) must consent to the submission;
    • Be written in the past tense, from a third-person perspective, and without author bias or editorializing. Present the facts as they occurred; the case author(s) can comment on these facts and give their assessments in the Teaching Note later but not in the case itself;
    • Have exhibits (figures, tables, etc.), grouped at the end of the case, after the references. Each exhibit should have a number and title, as well as a source, and be referenced in the text of the case in the appropriate place (i.e. where the reader understanding will be aided by the exhibit). Though in-text citations in cases are rare, wherever possible citations should be embedded in the text, with bibliographic information restricted to a "Reference List" at the end of the case. Follow APA 6th edition guidelines for citations;
    • Be submitted in Microsoft Word format. The first page should contain only the title and the Short Description (80 words). The rest of the document should be written in size 12 Times New Roman font, double spaced, with 1-inch (2.5 cm) margin, and 8.5 by 11-inch page setting or A4 (APA 6th is required) and not exceed 25 pages in total, including exhibits and references. The name of the author(s) and other indicators of authorship should be completely absent from the text to permit anonymous review.
  • Consent Form (Download Here): Required for Practice-Based Cases Presentations only (both Full Case or Detailed Abstract must include) An uploaded document that must accompany a Practice-Based Case submission, where the client in the case study gives consent to the submission.

Participant Roles: Please note that not all roles are available for all proposal submission types. The CFP system will show you only those roles available for the proposal submission type you have selected.

Participants do not have to be ILA members; however, all participants must have a profile in the ILA database. Please see the “Adding a Participant” section above for details. Note: ILA members receive the best rates on conference registration.

  • Presenter: A contributor to, author of, or co-author of the proposal/research who will attend and present at the conference.
  • Contributor (non-presenting): A person who has contributed to the scholarly research/work behind the proposal but will NOT present at the conference. This role should only be used if the proposal is scholarly in nature. For non-scholarly proposals, only participants attending and presenting at the conference should be listed. Note: A Contributor will be listed as “Co-Author” in the online and printed programs.
  • Session Organizer (non-presenting): A person who has designed the presentation, organized the presenters, etc. and who acts as the main point of contact regarding the proposal. This is a non-presenting, behind-the-scenes role and Session Organizers are NOT listed in the online or printed programs. Session Organizers who are also presenting should be listed a second time as a Presenter, Chair, or Discussant on the proposal.
  • Chair: A person who acts as a session moderator. For a symposium, the chair will introduce and thank each presenter, keep time so none of the segments (presentation plus any questions) go over, and moderate any discussion after all have presented. For a panel discussion, the chair will act as a facilitator by briefly introducing the overall panel/panelists, posing discussion questions as necessary, moderating audience participation, and assisting with the session's flow. NOTE: Symposia require both a chair and a discussant. NOTE: To maximize participation and role effectiveness, a presenter in a symposium or a panelist on a panel should not also serve as the chair.
  • Discussant: This role is available for Symposium submissions only. The role of the discussant is analytical; they help deepen the discussion and provide useful feedback. They review the abstracts and/or papers before the conference, noting at least one interesting aspect of each, drafting a few questions, and identifying the links between the papers/presentations. At the session, the discussant shares brief and constructive feedback, suggests areas for further exploration or implications for the field, and offers themes or questions that bridge the papers. (NOTE: To maximize participation and role effectiveness, a presenter or chair should not also serve as the discussant of their symposium.)

NOTE TO SUBMITTER: As the submitter of an individual presentation or a workshop, you will automatically be listed as a presenter. As the submitter of a panel or symposia, you will automatically be listed as Session Organizer.

  • If you are listed as Presenter and do not wish to be, you must add at least one other presenter before removing yourself from the proposal.
  • If you are listed as Session Organizer and do not wish to be, you must add at least one other session organizer before removing yourself from the proposal.
  • Furthermore, please be aware that Session Organizers do not appear in the print or online programs. If you are participating in the session at the conference, please make yourself Presenter, Chair, or Discussant in addition to Session Organizer.

Tips for Submitting

  • As you organize your submission, ask your co-participants if they are already part of the ILA and if not, you'll need their name, title, organization, and email address. You can go here and type their email address to see if they are already in the system. If they are new, you (or they) can add them before you begin or as you complete your submission. Note: it takes an hour for the ILA database and the CFP systems to sync.
  • It is important to review the evaluation criteria before submitting as more details about requirements are included in this section based on seven criteria.
  • Create your submission in a word-processing program first and save it. Cut and paste information into the online system.
  • IMPORTANT: The review process for ALL submissions is a double-blind peer-reviewed process; therefore, proposal Titles, Descriptions, Detailed Abstracts, Full Papers, and Full Cases must not include specific author-identifying information. Participant information is entered in separate fields that will be hidden during the blind review. Submissions that include author-identifying information may be subject to immediate rejection. Accepted proposals will have the opportunity to revise and include identifying information at a later date.
  • The online submission system will timeout after 60 minutes if you stay on the same page. You can refresh your session by clicking on the timer in the gray header at the top of every page. Note: If you time out of the session and have not finished submitting your proposal, you will have to start over. A proposal is not saved until it is completely submitted.
  • The proposal system only allows for plain text to be entered into text boxes. Therefore, all formatted text (font sizes, colors, bolding, italics, etc.) will appear as plain text. Please do not include tables, graphics, photos, etc. These and formatted texted may be included in uploaded Full Papers and Full Cases.
  • Be sure to click on the "Accept and Continue" button at the bottom of each page until you reach the confirmation page. When a proposal is successfully submitted, the system will display a confirmation page and will send a confirmation message to the email address in your ILA profile. Proposals will not save to the system if you exit before reaching the confirmation page.
  • You can edit your proposal until 15 November 2018 submission deadline. Log in with your ILA credentials, click on "Submit or Edit a Proposal" on the Submitter Menu, then click on the "edit" link next to the title of the proposal. In order to save all changes, click on the "Accept and Continue" button at the bottom of each page until you reach the confirmation page. If you exit the proposal before reaching the confirmation page, your edits will not be saved.
  • To Serial Comma or Not? Please follow the ILA Style Guide when writing your program book title and short description. This two-page document covers the most common style issues such as serial commas, capitalization, and more. If it's not covered in the style guide, please follow APA 6th guidelines.

Questions?

Please contact us at WLcfp@ila-net.org or +1 (202) 470-4818.

PRESENTATION FORMAT

Each proposal must select an intended format. Please be advised that accepted proposals may be assigned a different presentation format than was originally submitted. In some cases, a submission's format is changed because we are unable to group it with other presentations to form a session on a common topic. Rather than rejecting these worthy proposals, we may offer you an alternative presentation format. (That's one reason why we encourage the submission of pre-organized complete panels and symposia.) If a proposal is accepted, it is incumbent upon the submitter/participants to make note of the assigned presentation format before confirming participation in the conference.

In the online system, presentation formats are divided into two categories to delineate between Complete Session Submissions and Individual Presentation Submissions. Detailed descriptions of these categories and proposal types follow.

Complete Session Submissions

These are sessions that are given a full-time slot in a presentation room if accepted. They are not grouped with other accepted submissions.

Symposium (Scholarship-Based)

A Symposium is a group of 3-4 related Full Papers or scholarly Detailed Abstracts submitted together with a chairperson as a complete session submission; discussants can also be included. All Detailed Abstracts and Full Papers need to be original and not previously presented or published.

A Symposium submission must include a Title, Short Description, Detailed Abstract (identifying the overarching framework for the session and how the individual presentations fit within that framework), and References for the overall symposium. In addition, presentation submissions inside the Symposium must include a Title, Short Description, EITHER a Full Paper OR a Detailed Abstract, and References. Also see evaluation criteria for more details. Available participant roles are Chair (required), Discussant, Presenter, and Contributor. A Full Paper must:

  • Be completed in the following format: Times New Roman 12-point font, double spaced, 1-inch (2.5 cm) margin, and 8.5 by 11-inch page setting or A4 (APA 6th is required);
  • Have a page count within the range of 15-25 pages, double-spaced (including figures, table, references); and
  • Be uploaded as a Microsoft Word document at the time of submission. NOTE: If you are submitting multiple papers for your symposium presentations, the system only allows for one (1) Microsoft Word document to be uploaded for the whole submission; therefore, the submitter must collect all of the Full Papers in the submission and compile them into one Microsoft Word document before uploading.

Workshop

Workshops include interactive demonstrations or experiential sessions rooted in audience participation and active learning. Only select this format if half or more of the time will be spent on experiential learning and innovative, active audience participation.

A Workshop submission must include a Title, Short Description, Detailed Abstract, and References. The Detailed Abstract must include the purpose, need, supporting literature, a description of activities, time allocation for each portion of the session, and the expected learning outcomes for participants. Also see evaluation criteria for more details. Available participant role is Presenter. There are limited slots for workshops, so submissions that include multiple facilitators will be given higher priority.

Panel

An informed discussion and/or debate on a topic by 3-4 people with contrasting or complementary points of view, moderated by a chairperson, with time reserved for audience participation, questions, and comments. The majority of the session time should be spent in unscripted discussion or debate amongst the panelists. Formal presentations are not appropriate for this type of session. Various types of panel sessions can be submitted in this category (e.g., authors, experts, educators, practitioners).

A Panel submission must include a Title, Short Description, Detailed Abstract, and References. Include in the Detailed Abstract the session plan, information about the panelists’ levels of expertise and why they were selected (without revealing identities; titles and sectors are allowed), the questions that will be asked of panelists to assist in an interactive and engaging experience for attendees and a description of the facilitation methods proposed. Also see evaluation criteria for more details. Available participant roles are Chair (required) and Presenter (minimum of 3 and maximum of 4).

Individual Presentation Submissions

The Program Team groups accepted individual presentations together to form a session.

Presentation Scholarly (Full Papers or Detailed Abstracts)

Full papers or scholarly Detailed Abstracts can be submitted in this session type. Three or four related Full Papers/Detailed Abstracts will be grouped together by the Program Team to make up a complete session. (NOTE: If yours is part of a self-grouped set of 3-4 presentations, submit your proposal as a Symposium.) A Full Paper is a completely developed written, scholarly product documenting research, presenting theories, or arguing a particular point of view within the field of leadership. Also see evaluation criteria for more details. A scholarly Presentation should have NOT been previously presented at another academic conference or submitted for publication (by the date it was uploaded into the conference system) or published.

Submissions for a Presentation must include a Title, Short Description, and References. Submissions must include EITHER a Detailed Abstract OR upload a Full Paper. Available participant roles are Presenter and Contributor. A full paper must:

  • Be completed in the following format: Times New Roman 12-point font, double spaced, 1-inch (2.5 cm) margin, and 8.5 by 11 inch page setting or A4 (APA 6th is required);
  • Have a page count within the range of 15-25 pages, double-spaced (including figures, table, references); and
  • Be uploaded as a Microsoft Word document at the time of submission.

Presentation Practice-Based Case (Full Case or Detailed Abstract)

Submissions are required to be descriptions of unique decision-focused cases that have been faced by a woman in a leadership role at a specific point in time and dealing with issues of importance to one or more of the conference streams. Fictional cases are not accepted. There is a dearth of teaching cases where women, particularly women of color, are the protagonists. The intent of this new presentation format is to connect practitioners who are facing challenges relevant to any of the conference streams to academics who are interested in working together to develop teaching cases and teaching notes. Three or four related Full Cases/Detailed Abstracts will be grouped together by the Program Team to make up a complete session.

Submissions for a Case Study must include a Title, Short Description (summarizing the case), References, and a completed Consent Form. Submissions must include EITHER a Detailed Abstract OR an uploaded Full Case sufficient to assess its potential as a teaching case and to engage an academic who will write the Teaching Case and Teaching Note with the practitioner after the conference. Available participant roles are Presenter and Contributor. Also see evaluation criteria for more details. A submission must comply with the following:

  • All cases must be previously unpublished;
  • Permission to submit (signed release form) must be uploaded at the time of submission; while consultants or academics may identify potential cases, the client (the protagonist and their organization) must consent to the submission;
  • All cases should be written in the past tense, from a third-person perspective, and without author bias or editorializing. Present the facts as they occurred; the case author(s) can comment on these facts and give their assessments in the Teaching Note later but not in the case itself;
  • Exhibits (figures, tables, etc.) should be grouped at the end of the uploaded Full Case, after the references. Each exhibit should have a number and title, as well as a source, and be referenced in the text of the case in the appropriate place (i.e. where the reader understanding will be aided by the exhibit). Though in-text citations in cases are rare, wherever possible citations should be embedded in the text, with bibliographic information restricted to a "Reference List" at the end of the case. Follow APA 6th edition guidelines for citations;
  • Full Cases are to be uploaded in Microsoft Word format. The first page should contain only the title and the Short Description (80 words). The rest of the document should be written in size 12 Times New Roman font, double spaced, with 1-inch (2.5 cm) margin, and 8.5 by 11-inch page setting or A4 (APA 6th is required) and not exceed 25 pages in total, including exhibits and references. The name of the author(s) and other indicators of authorship should be completely absent from the text to permit anonymous review.
  • The system only allows for one (1) Microsoft Word document to be uploaded for each submission; therefore, the submitter must compile the Full Case AND the Consent Form into one Microsoft Word document.
  • Fuller description of Teaching Cases can be found here.

Note: The proposal system only allows for plain text to be entered into the field text boxes. Therefore, all formatted text (font sizes, colors, bolding, italics, etc.) will appear as plain text. Tables, graphics, photos, etc. cannot be included in text boxes. If you would like to include formatted text in your Detailed Abstract, you may upload the Detailed Abstract as a Word document, in addition to the Consent Form, instead. The system only allows for one (1) Microsoft Word document to be uploaded for each submission; therefore, the submitter must compile the Detailed Abstract and Consent Form into one Microsoft Word document.

 

Developmental Roundtable Discussion Scholarship-Based (Full Papers or Detailed Abstracts)

The developmental roundtable discussion format is designed for individuals who are at various stages of their scholarly projects and interested in receiving feedback. Doctoral students are welcome to submit their dissertation proposals. Three to four papers will be grouped together by the program team into a concurrent session. One or two senior scholars will be asked to chair the session, and they will help facilitate the sharing of papers, drafts, or proposals BEFORE the conference. All authors accepted for the Developmental Roundtable Discussions will be asked to review all of the other papers in their session, so they are prepared to give helpful feedback to each other in addition to that of the senior scholar(s).

During the session, each author should come prepared with a 4-5 minute overview of their project or study, and a short list of two to three questions or challenges for which they would like suggested direction and advice. Other participants in the session should ask clarifying questions, offer suggestions, and help the authors address hidden assumptions and potential challenges. Authors will not use slides but are asked to bring handouts to distribute. Note: No electricity will be available nor will AV equipment or display tables be permitted.

Submissions for a Developmental Roundtable Discussion must include a Title, Short Description, and References. Submissions must include EITHER a Detailed Abstract OR upload a Full Paper. Also see evaluation criteria for more details. Available participant roles are Presenter and Contributor. A full paper must:

  • Be completed in the following format: Times New Roman 12-point font, double spaced, 1-inch (2.5 cm) margin, and 8.5 by 11-inch page setting or A4 (APA 6th is required);
  • Have a page count within the range of 15-25 pages, double-spaced (including figures, table, references); and
  • Be uploaded as a Microsoft Word document at the time of submission.

Interactive Roundtable Discussion (Scholarship-Based)

The roundtable format is designed for engaging and stimulating small group discussions on topics of common interest. This format is an excellent venue for getting targeted feedback and meeting colleagues with common interests. To maximize participation, no concurrent sessions are scheduled during the roundtable session. The organizer has 30 minutes to frame the topic and facilitate a discussion with participants joining the table. After thirty minutes, participants have the opportunity to move to another roundtable or remain where they are to continue the conversation. This session can present new scholarly work, as well as work already presented but with progress toward new thinking and plans. Note: No electricity will be available nor will AV equipment or display tables be permitted.

Submissions for an Interactive Roundtable Discussion (Scholarship-Based) presentation must include a Title, Short Description, Detailed Abstract, and References. Also see evaluation criteria for more details. Available participant roles are Presenter and Contributor.

Interactive Roundtable Discussion (Practice-Based)

The roundtable format is designed for engaging and stimulating small group discussions on topics of common interest. This format is an excellent venue for getting targeted feedback and meeting colleagues with common interests. To maximize participation, no concurrent sessions are scheduled during the roundtable session. The organizer has 30 minutes to frame the topic and facilitate a discussion with participants joining the table. After thirty minutes, participants have the opportunity to move to another roundtable or remain where they are to continue the conversation. This session can present new practice-based work, as well as work already presented but with progress toward new thinking and plans. Note: No electricity will be available nor will AV equipment or display tables be permitted.

Submissions for an Interactive Roundtable Discussion (Practice-Based) presentation must include a Title, Short Description, Detailed Abstract, and References. Also see evaluation criteria for more details. Available participant roles are Presenter and Contributor.

SUBMISSION REVIEW PROCESS

The ILA Women and Leadership Conference review process is a rigorous 3-step process. Proposals submitted on time and fulfilling all of the requirements will be forwarded for blind-review.

Step 1: During this first round, each submission is read in a double-blind review by up to three reviewers per stream. Neither the authors of the submissions nor the reviewers will know the identity of the other. The criterion used to review submissions during this step is available for your review.

Step 2: Stream Co-Chairs will then read submissions and reviewer evaluations to identify and recommend a diverse collection of quality submissions that meet the stream's goals.

Step 3: Finally, the Conference Program Co-Chairs and Conference Co-Chairs will review the recommendations of the streams, ensure that nothing was overlooked, and work together to create the overall conference program.

EVALUATION CRITERIA

There are seven (7) general criteria, each worth a maximum of five points, guiding the review of submissions. Specifics about each criterion are included below according to the following categories:

  • Scholarship-Based Submissions: Scholarly work (e.g., research projects, theory/conceptual papers, literature reviews) can be presented in various formats: Presentation (Full Papers or Detailed Abstracts), Developmental Roundtable Discussion (Full Papers or Detailed Abstracts), Symposium (Full Papers or Detailed Abstracts), or Interactive Roundtable Discussion.
  • Practice-Based Submissions: Practice-based submissions can be presented in two formats: Presentation - Practice-Based Case (Full Case or Detailed Abstract) or Interactive Roundtable Discussion. There are also practice-based submissions that are scholarly in nature; these should be reviewed using the scholarship-based submission criteria.
  • Workshops: Workshop sessions include interactive demonstrations or experiential sessions (e.g., workshops) rooted in audience participation and active learning, with half or more of the time spent on experiential learning and active audience participation.
  • Panels: Panel sessions can include sessions with authors, experts, educators, practitioners, and others, and are unscripted discussions and/or debates.

Criteria 1: PROBLEM, NEED, AND SIGNIFICANCE

Scholarship-Based Submissions: For research-based papers/scholarly abstract submissions, the research problem(s) and need are clearly stated. Significance of the problem is well justified. For conceptual papers/scholarly abstract submissions, the gap(s) in existing theories or the problematization of existing theories that challenge their assumptions, are clearly stated. Significance of the gap or problematization is well justified. For literature reviews, the purpose, the need, and the significance of the review are clearly stated and justified. The intended contribution is clearly articulated for all three types of submissions.

Practice-Based Submissions: Problem and need are clearly stated. For Cases, the specific decision facing the protagonist is clearly stated. Significance of the problem/decision is well justified. The practice, its setting, the organizational needs, and why the practice was significant to the organization and the leadership profession are clearly described.

Workshops: Problem and need are clearly stated, along with the purpose and goals of the session. This should include information about the relationship between these elements and the session's subject material.

Panels: Problem and need are clearly stated, along with the purpose and goals of the session. This should include information about the relationship between these elements and the session's subject material.

Criteria 2: FRAMEWORK

Scholarship-Based Submissions: For research-based papers/scholarly abstract submissions, the research is grounded in a theoretical framework. For conceptual papers/scholarly abstract submissions, the extant theoretical framework in a specific literature (e.g. gender studies, critical management, organizational behavior, etc.) is reviewed. For literature reviews, the theoretical framework used is identified and described.

Practice-Based Submissions: Practice is grounded in a framework based on literature and contains references for the materials/information used to design the practice.

Workshops: Submission is grounded in a framework based on literature.

Panels: The format is best suited to deep-dive into the subject matter. Submitters provide enough information about the panelists’ levels of expertise (without identifying them; titles and sectors are allowed) to warrant a panel. There needs to be at least one panelist that can connect the discussion to the literature.

Criteria 3: QUESTIONS AND CONTENT

Scholarship-Based Submissions: For research-based papers/scholarly abstracts submissions, research questions/hypotheses are well articulated and address important questions and relationships. For conceptual papers/scholarly abstract submissions, the gap in the specific literature is well articulated or the literature is problematized and specific assumptions questioned. For literature reviews, the specific questions used to select the design and search methods are described.

Practice-Based Submissions: Submission addresses important questions and relationships which test existing knowledge, research, and theory or lead to future research.

Workshops: Includes a detailed description of the session; session description (content) clearly explains the innovative leadership work through creative, interactive presentation formats.

Panels: Includes a detailed description of the session; session description (content) clearly explains the details regarding why the panel session will benefit attendees.

Criteria 4: DESIGN

Scholarship-Based Submissions: For research-based papers/scholarly abstract submissions, research design (from a range of qualitative or quantitative methods) chosen is the best approach for answering the research questions. Data collection and analysis meet applicable standards of methodological rigor. For conceptual papers/scholarly abstract submissions, positioning in the specific literature is identified and the argumentation logical. For literature reviews, the type of review (e.g. systematic, critical interpretive synthesis, scoping, etc.) is identified and justified based on purpose of the review.

Practice-Based Submissions: Provide information about the design of the practice and evidence that the practice design clearly addressed the organizational need and incorporated what is known about the subject from existing research and theory.

Workshops: Workshops must include a detailed description of session components (plan for session), time allocation for each portion, description of format, style, and an agenda for the session that is to be innovative, intellectually stimulating, generative of a high level of scholarly dialogue, and participative by both presenters and audience.

Panels: Panel submissions should include a session plan, description of the facilitation methods, and questions that will be asked to panelists to assist in an interactive and engaging experience for attendees.

Criteria 5: RESULTS, FINDINGS, AND OUTCOMES

Scholarship-Based Submissions: For research-based papers/scholarly abstract submissions, results and findings are derived logically and/or conceptually from methodology. Detailed Abstracts and Developmental Roundtables should include at least a statement regarding preliminary findings of at least a portion of the work. For conceptual papers/scholarly abstract submissions, constructs are clearly defined and the relationships between them logically argued. Visual representations in figures of the resulting theory is encouraged. For literature reviews, discussion of the content of the review is logical and well-articulated.

Practice-Based Submissions: Includes descriptions of outcomes of the practice, with metrics where appropriate. Ensure that the outcomes are realistically a result of the practice.

Workshops: Clearly states the expected learning outcomes.

Panels: Clearly states the expected learning outcomes.

Criteria 6: CONCLUSIONS

Scholarship-Based Submissions: Conclusions are well supported by the study, theorizing, or review of the literature. If research is still in progress then conclusion should be based upon what has been done thus far.

Practice-Based Submissions: Author(s) should briefly describe the main lessons learned from the practice, the next steps for the practice, and what future work could be done to test the practice and its implications for research, theory, and/or practice.

Workshops: Provides evidence that it is new, innovative, and makes a substantive contribution to leadership knowledge and/or practice.

Panels: Provides evidence that it is new, innovative, and makes a substantive contribution to leadership knowledge and/or practice.

Criteria 7: IMPLICATIONS

Scholarship-Based Submissions: Research, theorizing, or review of the literature contributes (or may contribute) important, new knowledge to the leadership field or impact leadership practice and development. Research lends credibility to the field by focusing on areas of key interest to business, government, and/or society. Authors may elect to suggest (or forecast) how research in progress will contribute to important, new knowledge if research is not completed.

Practice-Based Submissions: Practice contributes important, new knowledge to the leadership field or impacts leadership practice and development. Information lends credibility to the field by focusing on areas of key interest to business, government, and/or society. Author(s) describe the implications for practice and, if applicable, research and theory. Also, are these implications important and/or add credibility to the field of leadership?

Workshops: Includes how session provides attendees with implications to future practice, theory, and/or research.

Panels: Includes how session provides attendees with implications to future practice, theory, and/or research.

REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS

If your abstract, paper, or proposal is accepted, each presenter (Presenter, Chair, Discussant) listed must register for the conference. The ILA does not pay presenters, reimburse expenses (e.g. travel, lodging, or copying), or waive conference registration fees. All presenters, co-presenters, chairs, and discussants are required to register and pay published conference fees. Online registration and registration fees for the conference will be available on the ILA website on 01 December 2018.

NOTIFICATION AND IMPORTANT DATES

15 November 2018: Submission deadline.

15 January 2019: Notification of acceptance/rejection will be e-mailed to all presenters. During the review process presentations may be changed to an alternate presentation format, so please read your acceptance email carefully.

28 January 2019: Presenter registration deadline. If you have not registered for the conference by 28 January, your presentation will be subject to removal from the schedule.

22 February 2019: Accepted presenters will be notified of their session's schedule (day, time, room). Lead presenters are responsible for insuring that all co-presenters receive the notifications about presentation status and scheduling information.


Address

International Leadership Association
8601 Georgia Ave. #1010
Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA

Contacts

Email: conferences@ila-net.org
Phone: +1 .202.470.4818